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Intermediate Key Ideas
Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 5

 

Standard 1:             History of the United States and New York   Intermediate Grades 5-8

Students will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.

Key Idea 1:  The study of New York State and United States history requires an analysis of the development of American culture, its diversity and multicultural context, and the ways people are unified by many values, practices, and traditions.
Performance Indicators:  This is evident when students                                                             

·          explore the meaning of American culture by identifying the key ideas, beliefs, and patterns of behavior, and traditions that help define it and unite all Americans 

·          interpret the ideas, values, and beliefs contained in the Declaration of Independence and the New York State Constitution and United States Constitution, Bill of Rights, and other important historical documents

Key Idea 2:  Important ideas, social and cultural values, beliefs, and traditions from New York State and United States history illustrate the connections and interactions of people and events across time and from a variety of perspectives.
Performance Indicators:  This is evident when students

·          describe the reasons for periodizing history in different ways

·          investigate key turning points in New York State and United States history and explain why these events or developments are significant

·          understand the relationship between the relative importance of United States domestic and foreign policies over time

·          analyze the role played by the United States in international politics, past and present

Key Idea 3:  Study about the major social, political, economic, cultural, and religious developments in New York State and United States history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.
Performance Indicators:  This is evident when students

·          complete well-documented and historically accurate case studies about individuals and groups who represent different ethnic, national, and religious groups, including Native American Indians, in New York State and the United States at different times and in different locations

·          gather and organize information about the important achievements and contributions of individuals and groups living in New York State and the United States

·          describe how ordinary people and famous historic figures in the local community, State, and the United States have advanced the fundamental democratic values, beliefs, and traditions expressed in the Declaration of Independence, the New York State and United States Constitutions, the Bill of Rights, and other important historic documents

·          classify major developments into categories such as social, political, economic, geographic, technological, scientific, cultural, or religious

Key Idea 4: The skills of historical analysis include the ability to: explain the significance of historical evidence; weigh the importance, reliability, and validity of evidence; understand the concept of multiple causation; understand the importance of changing and competing interpretations of different historical developments.
Performance Indicators:  This is evident when students

·          consider the sources of historic documents, narratives, or artifacts and evaluate their reliability

·          understand how different experiences, beliefs, values, traditions, and motives cause individuals and groups to interpret historic events and issues from different perspectives

·          compare and contrast different interpretations of key events and issues in New York State and United States history and explain reasons for these different accounts

·          describe historic events through the eyes and experiences of those who were there. (Taken from National Standards for History for Grades K-4)